8 comments on “This is NOT a Bomb Either

  1. But is it MIDI compatible? I’m betting Not.

    But neither was the crystal radio set I built as a youth, but it was hella fun anyway!

    Bravo John! It sounds like an old style analog synth.

    • Thanks Liz, No, it’s not MIDI compatible, but it is compatible with other voltage controlled analog devices, like my Theremin. I don’t have any MIDI gear anymore, it’s all DIY, like your radio.

  2. This is absolutely brilliant, John! I am blown away by your talent and creativity once again. I can’t wait to hear what you do with this awesome machine on your next album. Wonderful work.

  3. Hi John,

    You forgot to mention something in your adventures in LoFi article / tutorial / commentary on social justice… and that is- this stuff, the noise machines you made about a half dozen of and crammed them into one pretty advanced device for a novice…. this stuff us HARD! It’d hard to get it to work right, it’s time intensive, takes a certain kind of concentration or what I refer to as the signal path mindset, creativity (the game! Brilliant!) And just balls to throw some analog noise makers at the wall and see what sticks. You basically did every single baby step toward building your own serious synth / drum machine / sequencer / other noise generator either for stage and studio or to prototype for commercial purposes- you did every single baby step and jammed it into one project. That’s impressive. It takes some people three tries to get their first oscillator made. I scrapped my first try at the Atari Punk after I wasn’t paying attention while soldering the IC, AND not the socket, into the PC I was using…. soldering it backward, that is. Without the socket. So I was doing my best not to warp and melt the IC, but the damage was done. Stuffing that happens all the time to beginners. And here you are, with a functioning sequencer! Two APC modules! Oscillators! Envelopes, Filters, Noise Generators! And it all works!

    Simply incredible for your first try.

    As far as the comment about MIDI and your reply about DIY, they are compatible, you know. Just leave the computer part out AND MIDI can be a very powerful tool synchronizing all the toys you make.My rule, after wishing over and over that I could still use certain sounds I had made organically with home brewed synths, is to try to MIDI everything that can be “MIDIFIED,” and never shut out any possibilities when it comes to making new sounds.

    I can’t believe you’ve never made a sequencer, a noise generator, oacillators, filters, and that you just decided that a circuit being used by a guy making an LED oscillating on and off via fades would translate to your project- and then went for it, and with that attitude, it was bound to work like a charm.

    I like your style. Go get ’em, dude…. go get ’em.

    • Hi Pete, Thank you so much. I’ve been building up to this, and I had a lot of help from folks online. I watched a lot of videos, and looked at a lot of schematics. I also made a lot of mistakes. for instance, several knobs turn the wrong way. I had originally wanted to put the oscillators on the left and the sequencer on the right, but did it backwards, because I was always looking at the back of the panel. The device has some weirdness in it’s operation as well, more than I can describe here. I got the idea to use the blinking LED circuit as an LFO from acircuit-bender who used that trick to add an LFO to a circuit-bent toy. The whole project did take a lot of time, and it’s still not finished, but I’m having fun with it already.

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